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Ultrasound

JRMC has a primary ultrasound suite with a dedicated private bathroom, changing area and waiting room. It has been designed to provide space for caregivers and family members who accompany patients for an ultrasound procedure, especially the families of Family BirthPlace patients.

Ultrasound is the use of sound waves to obtain a medical image or picture of various organs, tissues or blood vessels in the body. Ultrasound procedures performed at JRMC include scans of the heart, abdomen and OB/GYN. These include small areas such as breast, thyroid and testicle and vascular scans.

 

OBSTETRICAL ULTRASOUND

An obstetrical ultrasound examination uses sound waves to obtain a medical picture of the pregnant uterus and whenever possible the ovaries, adnexa, and surrounding tissues. Ultrasound is used in pregnancy to check the baby’s health and development and to evaluate maternal conditions such as bleeding, cramping, and pain.

The procedure provides information about the size and growth rate of the baby, the position of the baby and placenta, the amount of amniotic fluid, and the movement, breathing, and heartbeat of the baby. It can also detect multiple births, certain birth defects, and other conditions that could lead to problems during pregnancy and delivery.

A complete pregnancy ultrasound examination can be done from about three months gestation to term. A limited procedure is done in the early stages of pregnancy and can also be done to detect an ectopic pregnancy.

 

ULTRASOUND OF THE CAROTID ARTERIES

An ultrasound of the carotid arteries is often done to identify plaque deposits that narrow the vessel restricting the blood flow to the brain.

This restriction could cause a stroke or stroke-like symptoms such as:

  • numbness or weakness on one side of the body
  • temporary loss of vision in one eye
  • blurred or double vision in one eye
  • loss of balance, staggering, or falling
  • difficulty in speaking or understanding spoken or written words
  • loss of memory—brief periods of time that cannot be recalled
  • extreme dizziness

The ultrasound procedure consists of a thorough examination of the common carotid artery, the carotid bulb, the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the vertebral artery. Images will be acquired in gray-scale, color-flow and doppler spectral analysis.

 

ULTRASOUND OF THE FEMALE PELVIS

An ultrasound examination of the female pelvis uses sound waves to obtain a medical picture of the uterus, ovaries, adnexa and surrounding tissues. It is performed to identify uterine and ovarian pathology and to evaluate the endometrium, pelvic masses, and infertile conditions.

 

ULTRASOUND OF THE GALL BLADDER OR ABDOMEN

An ultrasound examination of the gallbladder/ abdomen uses sound waves to obtain a medical picture or image of various organs and tissues in the body. It is done to identify stones or pathology within the gallbladder, detect diseased or damaged tissues, locate abnormal growths and identify a variety of changing conditions.

 

ULTRASOUND OF THE RENAL KIDNEY OR BLADDER

An ultrasound examination of the kidneys/bladder uses sound waves to obtain a medical picture or image of various organs and tissues in the body. It is done to identify stones or pathology within the kidneys, detect diseased or damaged tissues, locate abnormal growths, and identify a variety of changing conditions.

 

VENOUS DUPLEX ULTRASOUND OF THE EXTREMITIES

A venous duplex ultrasound examination uses sound waves to obtain medical pictures or images of the venous system in the upper or lower extremities. The procedure includes gray scale, color flow imaging and doppler spectral analysis.

With the doppler analysis, ultrasound is bounced off moving red blood cells; the frequency of the ultrasound waves is shifted by the movement of the blood. This shift provides information about the velocity and character of the blood flow. Venous scanning is primarily done for deep vein thrombosis to identify the location of a blood clot and to provide follow-up examinations to monitor the thrombus after medication is given.