JRMC MAIN SITE | JRMC FOUNDATION | (701) 952-1050

Nuclear Medicine

Primary procedures performed in nuclear medicine include bone, gall bladder and thyroid uptake scans and rest/stress scans of the heart.

 

ADENOSINE OR ADENOWALK CARDIOLITE MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION SCAN

The heart receives blood from vessels called coronary arteries. If these arteries become partially blocked or narrowed, the heart muscle may not receive the blood it needs to function properly. The myocardial perfusion scan is performed to identify areas of the heart that do not receive an adequate blood supply especially while under stress from exercise.

The procedure routinely consists of the following parts:

  • The radionuclide will be injected while you are at rest and a nuclear camera will take images of your heart.
  • The radionuclide will be injected after injection of a drug that stresses the heart and additional images will be taken of your heart.
  • The radiologist will compare the amount of blood flowing through the heart muscle during stress and at rest.

The myocardial perfusion scan involves the administration by injection of a small amount of a radioactive material which is quickly cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that from an x-ray C-T scan.

 

BONE SCAN

A nuclear medicine bone scan is a diagnostic procedure performed to evaluate orthopedic injuries, fractures, tumors, or unexplained bone pain. For the procedure, a nuclear medicine technologist will inject a diagnostic drug containing a small amount of radioactivity into a vein in your arm. The drug travels through the blood to the soft tissue, and with time is absorbed by the skeletal system. Images will be taken of the entire body with the camera moving slowly above and below your body or the camera will be moved manually to various positions to perform a limited procedure of a selected area of interest.

The scan is routinely performed 4 hours after injection of the radiopharmaceutical. For certain conditions, an initial scan may also be done during injection to evaluate the blood flow and soft tissue in the specific area you are having pain. The radiologist will compare your bone scan with x-rays for correlation of suspicious areas. The nuclear medicine bone scan involves the administration of a very small amount of a radioactive material that is quickly cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that from an x-ray or a CT Scan.

 

LEXISCAN OR LEXIWALK CARDIOLITE MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION SCAN

The heart receives blood from vessels called coronary arteries. If these arteries become partially blocked or narrowed, the heart muscle may not receive the blood it needs to function properly. The myocardial perfusion scan is performed to identify areas of the heart that do not receive an adequate blood supply especially while under stress from exercise.

The procedure routinely consists of the following parts:

  • The radionuclide will be injected while you are at rest and a nuclear camera will take images of your heart.
  • The radionuclide will be injected after injection of a drug that stresses the heart and additional images will be taken of your heart.
  • The radiologist will compare the amount of blood flowing through the heart muscle during stress and at rest.

The myocardial perfusion scan involves the administration by injection of a small amount of a radioactive material which is quickly cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that from an x-ray C-T scan.

 

THYROID SCAN

A thyroid scan is performed to evaluate the thyroid gland structure, to determine its size and shape and to identify the presence of any abnormalities or lumps. It can also be performed to identify any ectopic thyroid tissue that may be located at the base of the tongue or below the sternum.

The procedure involves the injection of a small amount of radioactivity and obtaining multiple images of the thyroid gland in different projections. The radioactivity that is injected is quickly cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that from an x-ray or CT scan.

 

THYROID UPTAKE I – 123

A thyroid uptake procedure provides an indirect study of thyroid physiology by studying the rate of thyroidal accumulation, incorporation, and release of radioiodine. It is performed to determine the overall function of your thyroid gland (a gland in the neck that regulates growth and metabolism) and to show its structure. You will be given a small amount of radioactive iodine in capsule form. An uptake procedure, which involves recording the counts emitted from the thyroid gland, will be performed at 4 hours and again at 24 hours. A picture of the gland’s structure to determine its size and shape or the presence of any abnormalities or lumps may also be taken.

The thyroid uptake procedure involves the administration of a very small amount of radioactive material which is quickly Cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that received from regular x-rays or a CT scan.

 

VENTILATION/PERFUSION LUNG SCAN

A nuclear medicine lung scan is a diagnostic procedure performed to evaluate the movement of air (ventilation) and blood flow (perfusion) both into and out of the lungs. In order to function properly, the lungs depend on an adequate supply of air to the air sacs and blood to their arteries.

Conditions like emphysema, infection, and pulmonary embolism can affect lung function. Pulmonary embolism is caused by a blood clot that obstructs the blood flow into an artery. The ventilation/perfusion lung scan can detect pulmonary embolism (blood clot) as well as other conditions which affect lung function.

The procedure is routinely done as two separate studies: The first involves acquiring images after you have inhaled a small amount of radioactivity through a mouthpiece; the second involves imaging after a radiopharmaceutical has been injected into the blood. The radiologist will compare the two sets of images to identify any abnormalities or filling defects.

The nuclear medicine lung scan involves the administration of a very small amount of a radioactive material which is quickly cleared from your body. The amount of radiation you will receive is comparable to that from an x-ray or a CT scan.