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Running of the Pink set for June 3

Posted on May 17, 2017

Running of the Pink set for June 3

Cancer is the leading cause of death of Stutsman County residents ages 45-84. Because of this, and because so many residents are affected by cancer, R.M. Stoudt hosts the annual Running of the Pink each year on the first Saturday in June which, this year, falls on June 3. All proceeds benefit the No Excuses Program and the local Women’s Way Chapter for breast and cervical cancer screenings as well as education and other needs. Jamestown Regional Medical Center hosts the No Excuses program every year, in conjunction with Central Valley Health. That day, women can come in for a basic screening as well as a mammogram, all in one quick visit. Plus, if women have any financial barriers, proceeds from Running of the Pink cover those needs. No Excuses helped 14 women at its last event in November. read...

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Early detection offers hope

Posted on Mar 13, 2017

Early detection offers hope

Alzheimer’s and dementia can be intimidating diseases to struggle with, and for many people, it’s often caught too late. Jamestown Regional Medical Center’s Speech Therapist Becca Gussiaas, is hoping to change that with a new service she is offering: Free memory screenings for people concerned about Alzheimer’s and dementia. Early detection for Alzheimer’s and dementia is key. Although dementia and Alzheimer’s share similar symptoms, dementia is not a specific disease, but a broad term describing a wide range of mental process disorders, such as memory loss, personality changes and impaired reasoning. Alzheimer’s is a specific type of progressive dementia with no known cure. According to Alz.org, Alzheimer’s is the number one cause of dementia in adults, with 1 in 9 adults over 65 suffering from it. read...

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Ladies Night raises $2,000+ for JRMC Cancer Center

Posted on Mar 2, 2017

Ladies Night raises $2,000+ for JRMC Cancer Center

An evening with friends made THE difference in the life of a cancer patient. Jamestown Regional Medical Center’s Auxiliary’s first ever Ladies Night raised more than $2,000. The event benefited the upcoming JRMC Cancer Center. “Battling cancer is a community effort,” said Carol Lawrence, Auxiliary member and former Gift Shoppe manager. JRMC is creating a cancer center with eight infusion rooms. The center would be the only one of its kind within 90 miles. At any given time, more than 100 Stutsman County residents are traveling more than 100 miles for chemotherapy care. JRMC’s Foundation hopes to raise $1.5 million for the JRMC Cancer Center. read...

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Flu activity hits Stutsman County

Posted on Mar 1, 2017

Flu activity hits Stutsman County

The flu is marching its way across Stutsman County, leaving coughing and achy bodies in its wake. Sixty-two cases of the flu in Stutsman County were reported to the North Dakota Department of Health for the week of February 18th, with numbers expected to rise. “ We are seeing an increase of patients in the emergency department with flu- like symptoms,” says Nikki Mack, an RN at JRMC, “ that means the virus is active and in the community.”  Mack says that although the flu is active in the community, there are steps you can take to prevent catching and spreading the virus. read...

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Finally, ENT is at JRMC!

Posted on Feb 13, 2017

Finally, ENT is at JRMC!

Dr. W. Thomas Coombe will join the staff of Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) as an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor. Dr. Coombe will begin seeing patients in March. Dr. Coombe has more than 30 years of experience as an ENT. Upon completion of his undergraduate degree at Kearney State College, Kearney, Neb., Coombe attended medical school at University of Nebraska, and residency at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dr. Coombe also has an additional MBA from San Diego State University, San Diego, Calif. Prior to joining JRMC, Coombe worked as an ENT in Bismarck for six years. read...

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Chronic wound healed through hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Posted on Feb 1, 2017

Chronic wound healed through hyperbaric oxygen therapy

It began as a small, pencil-eraser sized callous. It didn’t bother him much at first, but then it started to affect his walk, slowing his gait and becoming painful. And then it grew. “I have always been healthy and able to take care of myself, so I didn’t know why I couldn’t get this wound to heal,” said David Hilbert. Hilbert, a 62-year-old New Rockford resident, was too busy and too active to get sick. A self-employed carpenter, Hilbert needed his feet to survive. So he waited, hoping the wound would heal itself. Though a Type I diabetic for 30 years, Hilbert hoped he could control this wound on his own. But this was different. read...

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